How To Choose Laminate Flooring for Your Home

Laminate floors are a notable flooring alternative widely growing into the market; the synthetic multi-layered product is becoming a preferred substitute for wooden floors. Laminate flooring is definitely a choice to consider if you’re looking to do some flooring for your home; the appearance, versatility, and durability of these beauties are quite the steal. Besides, nothing beats the bargain for a realistic wooden feel that is equally visually impressive for just half the price of wood flooring like laminate flooring does.

 

What to Look For When Picking Laminate Flooring

Picking flooring for your space right off the bat without considering your options is never a good idea. So below we will cover some comprehensive guidelines for choosing the best-suited laminate flooring for your home. 

Aesthetics

Laminate floors come in an assortment of styles and designs. Confining yourself to a criterion when purchasing laminate flooring is nearly impossible; the different grains, patterns, and patinas embedded in laminate sheets and tiles leave you spoiled for choice. However, there’s always room for a little mix and match to get the texture that will blend seamlessly into your home. If your inspiration is a coastal vibe, then driftwood will do the trick; farmhouse lovers, on the other hand, will never go wrong with glossy old barn wood. Ultimately, you can always consult with a professional if the experience is a tad bit overwhelming for you.

Durability

If the goal is to fit floors that will serve your household for years to come, then this is it! Laminate flooring is among the most resilient solutions you can find in the market; you must know what you check. The Abrasion Criteria rating of laminate flooring helps you gauge its wear resistance. The higher the rating, the greater the tiles or sheets’ resilience to usage wear. For instance, AC 1 indicates minimal adaptability to footwear traffic, whereas AC 4 and 5 are tailored to take heavy commercial traffic. Conversely, laminate floors may not have a lifespan longer than wooden floors, but they sure are less susceptible to scratches and dents. Choose thicker laminate flooring for the long run.

 

Budget

Laminate floors are generally affordable compared to most flooring alternatives; however, that’s a fine line to tread. Advisably, have a budget and a breakdown of the materials you’ll need. A dollar difference may seem like no stretch until you’re getting thousands of square feet of laminate flooring for your home. Comparatively, getting defective flooring materials in a bid to save on cash will have you redoing your laminate floors in no time- this totals to a loss. While purchasing AC 5 laminate flooring for your home may tick the durability box, it is a little impractical as you can get an abrasion criterion that matches your household foot traffic for less. The key is to find a balance, go for a product that is within your range.

 

Lifestyle Match

Contrary to what you might think, your lifestyle significantly influences your choice of flooring. A busy household would typically go for a resilient flooring solution to withstand baby spills, dog paws, and muddy shoes. Laminate flooring’s resistance to abrasion, coupled with its maintenance ease, makes it the perfect fit for an active household. Unlike wooden flooring, laminated flooring does not require constant polishing and waxing; an occasional mop and sweep will do just fine. If you’re prone to slips and spills, waterproof laminate floors would be a lifesaver.

Conclusion

Investing in household flooring is a long-term commitment. Weighing in your flooring project gives you a perspective of all the available flooring solutions at your disposal. Laminate flooring offers a cost-efficient contemporary alternative that accommodates different spaces from classic, modern, and industrial homes. Before heading down to the supply store to grab your laminate flooring sheets, make a point to research the perfect fit for you. Your budget, lifestyle, and specific flooring needs should be the driving factors navigating your laminate flooring selection, but it ultimately comes down to your preference.